Pamahaw Anay!

I haven’t posted in a long time, but that’s only because I’ve been very busy ‘preparing’ for this post. And when I say preparing, I mean enjoying tasty Filipino pamahaw (snacks).

This isn’t the first time I’ve posted about how Food is Love in the Philippines. Also, it’s unlikely to be the last time. Because it’s a big deal.

 

In the US, as snack is usually something simple- a bag of chips, a piece of fruit, etc. In the Philippines a snack, though it can be simple, encompasses a much more broad range. The typical rule of thumb is, if it’s not served with a side of rice, it’s a snack.

 

Most days in my office things slow down around 10am as vendors arrive in the municipal hall with a selection of native sweet treats. Some are baked, like puto, a sweet rice flour muffin, often with a small slice of cheese baked into the center. Many, like Ibos, make use of glutenous (sticky) rice and some combination of coconut and brown sugar. Others, have a similar flavor, but use cassava (extra sticky) instead of rice.

Last weekend, at a Filipino heritage event, I even got to try making some native snacks myself! Below you can see part of the process of making Nilopak nga Saging. Cooked banana, young coconut, and brown sugar are added to the giant wooden mortar and pestle and mashed into a paste, then formed into balls. Nilopak nga Cassava and Baibai are made in a similar way, swapping out the banana for cassava or rice flour.

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Of course, fruit is a popular snack item as well, changing with the seasons. Right now, it’s mango time, with both the extra sweet Carabao mango, and the tougher more citrus-y Indian variety. Both are eaten ripe, or unripe with either salt of fermented shrimp paste (it’s grown on me). But, in 9 months I’ve gotten to try all kinds of fruits, many I’ve never heard of like rambutan, marang, lanzones, chico, and pamelo.

The second snack rush of the day starts around 3pm. A dependable go-to is some pancit noodles with bread. At first, I questioned the noodle sandwich, but I’ve been converted. Pizza and/or sweet spaghetti works too.

On an especially hot day, or one without a functioning AC, cold treats are the way to go. For 15 pesos (30 cents), you can get a shake in your choice of mango, coconut, or avocado. Some days, someone may spring for a 3-in-1 carton of ice cream. But, there’s no Neapolitan here. It’s chocolate, ube, and either cheese, mango, or pandan. Finally there is the Filipino king of frozen desserts, Halo-Halo (mean mix-mix), shaved ice with condensed milk, ice cream, sweet beans, fruit, leche flan, coconut jelly, and often more.

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A relatively simple halo-halo

Of course there are plenty more snacks worth discussing (the famous balut, malunggay pan de sal, fish crackers, deep-friend quail eggs, boiled/roasted peanuts, corn-on-the-cob, etc) but I’d like to end this post with my #1: BananaQ. It’s maybe the best food ever made. Best made with saba (a firm, but still sweet variety of banana), it’s coated in brown sugar, fried, and served warm on the stick. Unfortunately, it doesn’t seem to photograph well.

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I have eaten a shocking number of these in a single single sitting ❤

 

 

 

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Author: Cara Simpson

Fish enthusiast. Virginia born. Maryland educated. Philippines Peace Corps Volunteer.

One thought on “Pamahaw Anay!”

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